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Living Heritage

Living Heritage is about people who are engaged in the heritage and culture sector, from museum professionals and archivists, to tradition bearers and craftspeople - all those who keep heritage alive at the community level. We talk about their work, their passions, and the day-to-day safeguarding of culture and tradition.
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Now displaying: November, 2017
Nov 24, 2017

Gabriel Newman is a storyteller, actor, and educator based in Vernon, British Columbia. For the past fourteen years he has led the historic and paranormal walking tour, Ghost Tours of Vernon. He also created a community based storytelling food project called Social Potluck, which had him trading food for stories in order to create intimate mini community performance projects. His day job is as the Educational Coordinator at the Greater Vernon Museum and Archives where he creates and presents educational programming for students and adults. We talk about the museum, their innovative programming, and the art of straight razor shaving and sharpening scythes!

Nov 17, 2017

Kristin Catherwood is the Intangible Cultural Heritage Development Officer for Heritage Saskatchewan.  She studied Folklore at Memorial University of Newfoundland, and has a particular interest in vernacular architecture and cultural landscapes. Born and raised in the deep south of Saskatchewan on a family farm, Kristin is passionate about the cultural landscape and folk life of the rural prairies. Her graduate thesis, “Every Place had a Barn: The Barn as a Symbol of the Family Farm in Southern Saskatchewan” resulted in the The Barn Hunter blog which chronicled her cultural explorations of rural life. In her work with Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH), Kristin uses storytelling as a tool to connect people with place, and believes in empowering communities to tell their own stories and curate their own heritage. Her love of and respect for rural life is at the heart of her work, and she once again calls the rural prairies home.

Nov 10, 2017

In the past, the Newfoundland and Labrador household had to be versatile in order to survive. People made do with what they had and turned old objects into new items. It’s a centuries-old tradition of adaptive reuse and creativity that continues today. On Oct 26, 2017, host Dale Jarvis sat down for a chat at The Rooms with two of Newfoundland and Labrador’s crafty recyclers: Trent Hardy, mat maker and owner of Waste Knot Want Knot; and Ruth Noseworthy Green, artist and rug hooker. Trent Hardy founded his braided mat-making company on the principle that we should not be simply throwing away materials that can still be used, turning old fishing rope into modern floor mats. Ruth Noseworthy Green’s hooked mats have been exhibited in the Arts and Letters Competition, The Bonavista North Museum Gallery, the Kildevil Far, and hang in private collections across Canada. We talked about the tradition of reuse, reinvention, ropes, rags, and rugs!

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